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How to Start Your Own Health and Fitness Business

Starting a successful and sustainable health and fitness business isn’t as simple as finding a niche market and telling people what you offer.

It’s way more daunting than that—which is why most people never do it.

The good news: We’ve broken the entire process down into bite-sized tasks anyone can master.

With this free, step-by-step blueprint, you’ll learn how to:

Start a health and fitness biz now (even if you have “entrepreneur challenges” like a mortgage to pay and children to feed)

Create products and services you’re proud of (and that your clients are ready and willing to pay for)

Optimize your workflow (so you can maximize your income without sacrificing your family or health)

Delight your clients and create raving fans (so they do most of your marketing for you)

Even if entrepreneurship isn’t for you, this how-to guide is jam-packed with amazing tools and resources that can help you both work and live better.

For example, through a little partnership magic, we’re providing you with a $700 personality test you can take for FREE, no strings attached. The results will help you better understand what you’re good at and what challenges you—insights that can be invaluable no matter what your career path.

Ready to dig in? Let’s get started.

Step 1: Consider your context

You already know a client’s personal life and responsibilities will influence how much time and effort they can put toward their health and fitness goals.

The same is true for you and your entrepreneurial goals.

For example, if you have little to no savings—and dependents who rely on you—quitting a stable job for an entrepreneurial endeavor may not only seem scary, it could be the wrong thing for you.

So don’t beat yourself up if you’re finding it hard to “take the leap,” or if “now isn’t the right time.”

There are other ways to get started.

First, you can apply entrepreneurial practices within an innovative company, as part of your current (or new) job.

Often called “intrapreneurship,” this allows the creation of new products and services within an existing organization. And it’s becoming more and more popular. Indeed, you just might be able to find the creativity you’re looking for while also having the benefit of a stable paycheck.

Second, you could keep your day job and start a side business. (It might stay a side business, or maybe it eventually becomes your main source of income.)

We recommend this approach for most budding entrepreneurs who already have a stable income and want to test the market with their new ideas.

We’ll go deeper on this later in the guide, but for now, it’s important to spend some time learning about yourself.

Step 2: Gather relevant self-knowledge

One of the best ways to decide whether starting your own business is right for you is to learn more about yourself and how you work.

Entrepreneurship isn’t for everyone. While some folks’ superpowers align perfectly with what entrepreneurs need to succeed, other people’s skill sets may not be a good match.

How can you know if you’re well-suited to starting your own business?

We’ve created two assessments to help you decide.

Assessment #1: The Workview Assessment

Whether you want to work inside or outside the entrepreneurial realm, this two-minute assessment will help you:

  • Understand how you view your work and the role it plays in your life
  • Establish your own success metrics and use them to guide your daily decisions
  • Outline the key steps to take so you can live a more meaningful and fulfilling life

Click here for the Change Maker Academy Workview Assessment

Assessment #2: The Caliper Assessment

This personality test will help you figure out how to take advantage of your superpowers, mitigate your kryptonite, schedule your time more effectively, and collaborate with others in more mutually beneficial ways. In fact, at Precision Nutrition, every single job candidate is required to complete this assessment.

IMPORTANT NOTE: This assessment is robust and will take about 60 minutes to complete. While it normally costs $700 USD, it’s yours, right now, totally free. Once you complete it, you’ll receive a comprehensive report—with a breakdown of your personality and work insights—within five days.

It’s the most data-driven hiring tool on the market, and we’re excited to share it with you.

Click here for Caliper for Health and Fitness Professionals

Step 3: Map out what “starting” could look like

Let’s say you’ve done the assessments above and feel entrepreneurship is a good fit for you. (If it isn’t, that’s okay too.)

Our advice: Start small.

(Or, at least, start with “experiments” you can refine over time.)

Just as you’d likely recommend your clients ease into new health and wellness habits—and then build bigger ones as their skills and confidence grow over time—we encourage you to do the same when it comes to entrepreneurship.

You don’t need to go from zero to hero. 

Like anything worth doing, building a business takes time.

Unless you’re well-funded and have lots of free time, you might consider starting your business as a side hustle—something you do in addition to your primary work.

This has two benefits.

First, you’ll still have the peace of mind—and the ability to pay your bills—that comes from a steady paycheck.

Next, you’ll be able to test that what you want to offer is something people are willing to pay for—before you expect your business to deliver a reliable income.

While you might have to dedicate some evenings and weekends to make this happen, it’s amazing what can be accomplished in two to three hours of highly-focused, deep work.

Ask yourself this: What would “starting” look like if it didn’t have to be perfect?

Write out a plan for that approach. Even if you decide to “go big” with your first attempt, it’ll be useful to have a map for what it would look like if it were “easy.”

Step 4: Make a list of what you might offer the world

Once you’re ready to start your side hustle (or full-time new business), brainstorm a list of products and services that:

  • You’re interested in offering
  • You actually have the skills to pull off
  • You have access to the necessary resources for, or you have the ability and connections to acquire them
  • You think others might be willing to buy

The list can start long—and that’s fine. Brainstorms are best when lots of ideas, even bad ones, are allowed to emerge. You can prune the list later.

Here’s an example of what your brainstorm could look like:

Notice how there are hundreds of possible business ideas in this mind map.

It’s better to begin with too many ideas than not enough.

Step 5: Talk to people who have a track record of success

Once you have your seed ideas, find a few people who have done what you’d like to do—and have gotten paid for it—and ask them if you can interview them.

If they’re willing to talk to you for free, great. But don’t be afraid to pay them.

Paying to learn from smart, believable people is a great investment.

How much do you even offer? If you know their hourly rate, offering that amount is a safe bet. If you don’t, look up the salaries for similar roles—a quick Google search will do the trick—and use that as your guide.

Lastly, if you’re still feeling stuck, offer a generous amount (say, $100/hour). While it might seem like a lot, getting great advice will save you hours—if not weeks —of your time.

If they’re willing to share, ask more about:

  • where they list their services
  • how they find clients
  • how they get paid for what they do

(Make sure you’re not asking for client leads, pressing for new business opportunities, or asking for money. Remember: You’re just interviewing them about their own thinking, strategies, and tactics.)

Try to get a sense of what their average day looked like when they were building their business—and what it looks like today—to see if you’d actually be interested in the lifestyle that may be waiting for you.

Also, if you trust them with your ideas, consider asking their thoughts on your potential business concepts. Inquire as to which ones they think have potential, which may not, and why.

But…

Choose your sources wisely.

It’s sometimes difficult to tell who is actually doing well in the health and fitness space. For example, some of the best entrepreneurs we know don’t have a big public profile. They’re in the trenches every day working on their craft and motivating their teams.

So, unless your goal is to grow a large social following, we encourage you not to use someone’s number of followers (or public visibility) as your only criteria.

Likewise, some of the people making a big show on social media, or through PR campaigns, don’t have a business that matches their public performance. So, again, make sure you know whether the person you’re turning to for business-building advice is truly believable.

If the person does have tangible success, it’s important to make sure their version of success matches yours. For instance, if you want to create success online through creating sustainable client results, don’t copy someone who’s made money selling short-term (and possibly scammy) solutions.

Step 6: Narrow down your options

After you’ve had some discussions to get a better sense of what others have done to succeed and what they think of your options, begin to narrow down your choices.

Consider which potential business options seem more reasonable, which have a higher probability of success, and which you’re most excited about.

Do one or two rise above the rest? If so, consider setting aside the rest and fleshing out those with the most potential.

Step 7: Organize your ideas into a Lean Canvas

The Lean Canvas is a one-page business-plan template that’ll help you deconstruct your idea into its key assumptions.

Unlike detailed business plans that often take weeks or months to craft (and barely get read), the Lean Canvas takes 20 minutes to create and helps paint a good picture of your business at a glance.

Click here for the Change Maker Academy Lean Canvas Template
(with step-by-step instructions)

We recommend you fill this out to the best of your ability to get a general sense of what your idea entails, what assumptions you need to test, and what steps might be required to take your idea from vision to reality.

You can think of it as a working document that you can update every month or so as you find more evidence and test your idea in the real world.

Step 8: Talk to potential customers

In order to figure out what your potential clients want, and are willing to pay for, you need to talk with them, gather insights, and craft your offering to meet those needs.

Most businesses fail because they assume they know what clients want—and spend lots of time and money building it—only to find out later that no one actually wants what they’re selling.

To better understand your potential customers’ wants and needs, we recommend learning about a research methodology called Jobs To Be Done.

Jobs To Be Done helps you assume less, ask strategic questions, and listen deeply to figure out the real reasons people buy what they do, when they do.

It also helps you map people’s decision-making timelines, like this:

And the forces that push and pull them into making decisions, like this:


Source

Starting a successful and sustainable health and fitness business isn’t as simple as finding a niche market and telling people what you offer.

It’s way more daunting than that—which is why most people never do it.

The good news: We’ve broken the entire process down into bite-sized tasks anyone can master.

With this free, step-by-step blueprint, you’ll learn how to:

Start a health and fitness biz now (even if you have “entrepreneur challenges” like a mortgage to pay and children to feed)

Create products and services you’re proud of (and that your clients are ready and willing to pay for)

Optimize your workflow (so you can maximize your income without sacrificing your family or health)

Delight your clients and create raving fans (so they do most of your marketing for you)

Even if entrepreneurship isn’t for you, this how-to guide is jam-packed with amazing tools and resources that can help you both work and live better.

For example, through a little partnership magic, we’re providing you with a $700 personality test you can take for FREE, no strings attached. The results will help you better understand what you’re good at and what challenges you—insights that can be invaluable no matter what your career path.

Ready to dig in? Let’s get started.

Step 1: Consider your context

You already know a client’s personal life and responsibilities will influence how much time and effort they can put toward their health and fitness goals.

The same is true for you and your entrepreneurial goals.

For example, if you have little to no savings—and dependents who rely on you—quitting a stable job for an entrepreneurial endeavor may not only seem scary, it could be the wrong thing for you.

So don’t beat yourself up if you’re finding it hard to “take the leap,” or if “now isn’t the right time.”

There are other ways to get started.

First, you can apply entrepreneurial practices within an innovative company, as part of your current (or new) job.

Often called “intrapreneurship,” this allows the creation of new products and services within an existing organization. And it’s becoming more and more popular. Indeed, you just might be able to find the creativity you’re looking for while also having the benefit of a stable paycheck.

Second, you could keep your day job and start a side business. (It might stay a side business, or maybe it eventually becomes your main source of income.)

We recommend this approach for most budding entrepreneurs who already have a stable income and want to test the market with their new ideas.

We’ll go deeper on this later in the guide, but for now, it’s important to spend some time learning about yourself.

Step 2: Gather relevant self-knowledge

One of the best ways to decide whether starting your own business is right for you is to learn more about yourself and how you work.

Entrepreneurship isn’t for everyone. While some folks’ superpowers align perfectly with what entrepreneurs need to succeed, other people’s skill sets may not be a good match.

How can you know if you’re well-suited to starting your own business?

We’ve created two assessments to help you decide.

Assessment #1: The Workview Assessment

Whether you want to work inside or outside the entrepreneurial realm, this two-minute assessment will help you:

  • Understand how you view your work and the role it plays in your life
  • Establish your own success metrics and use them to guide your daily decisions
  • Outline the key steps to take so you can live a more meaningful and fulfilling life

Click here for the Change Maker Academy Workview Assessment

Assessment #2: The Caliper Assessment

This personality test will help you figure out how to take advantage of your superpowers, mitigate your kryptonite, schedule your time more effectively, and collaborate with others in more mutually beneficial ways. In fact, at Precision Nutrition, every single job candidate is required to complete this assessment.

IMPORTANT NOTE: This assessment is robust and will take about 60 minutes to complete. While it normally costs $700 USD, it’s yours, right now, totally free. Once you complete it, you’ll receive a comprehensive report—with a breakdown of your personality and work insights—within five days.

It’s the most data-driven hiring tool on the market, and we’re excited to share it with you.

Click here for Caliper for Health and Fitness Professionals

Step 3: Map out what “starting” could look like

Let’s say you’ve done the assessments above and feel entrepreneurship is a good fit for you. (If it isn’t, that’s okay too.)

Our advice: Start small.

(Or, at least, start with “experiments” you can refine over time.)

Just as you’d likely recommend your clients ease into new health and wellness habits—and then build bigger ones as their skills and confidence grow over time—we encourage you to do the same when it comes to entrepreneurship.

You don’t need to go from zero to hero. 

Like anything worth doing, building a business takes time.

Unless you’re well-funded and have lots of free time, you might consider starting your business as a side hustle—something you do in addition to your primary work.

This has two benefits.

First, you’ll still have the peace of mind—and the ability to pay your bills—that comes from a steady paycheck.

Next, you’ll be able to test that what you want to offer is something people are willing to pay for—before you expect your business to deliver a reliable income.

While you might have to dedicate some evenings and weekends to make this happen, it’s amazing what can be accomplished in two to three hours of highly-focused, deep work.

Ask yourself this: What would “starting” look like if it didn’t have to be perfect?

Write out a plan for that approach. Even if you decide to “go big” with your first attempt, it’ll be useful to have a map for what it would look like if it were “easy.”

Step 4: Make a list of what you might offer the world

Once you’re ready to start your side hustle (or full-time new business), brainstorm a list of products and services that:

  • You’re interested in offering
  • You actually have the skills to pull off
  • You have access to the necessary resources for, or you have the ability and connections to acquire them
  • You think others might be willing to buy

The list can start long—and that’s fine. Brainstorms are best when lots of ideas, even bad ones, are allowed to emerge. You can prune the list later.

Here’s an example of what your brainstorm could look like:

Notice how there are hundreds of possible business ideas in this mind map.

It’s better to begin with too many ideas than not enough.

Step 5: Talk to people who have a track record of success

Once you have your seed ideas, find a few people who have done what you’d like to do—and have gotten paid for it—and ask them if you can interview them.

If they’re willing to talk to you for free, great. But don’t be afraid to pay them.

Paying to learn from smart, believable people is a great investment.

How much do you even offer? If you know their hourly rate, offering that amount is a safe bet. If you don’t, look up the salaries for similar roles—a quick Google search will do the trick—and use that as your guide.

Lastly, if you’re still feeling stuck, offer a generous amount (say, $100/hour). While it might seem like a lot, getting great advice will save you hours—if not weeks —of your time.

If they’re willing to share, ask more about:

  • where they list their services
  • how they find clients
  • how they get paid for what they do

(Make sure you’re not asking for client leads, pressing for new business opportunities, or asking for money. Remember: You’re just interviewing them about their own thinking, strategies, and tactics.)

Try to get a sense of what their average day looked like when they were building their business—and what it looks like today—to see if you’d actually be interested in the lifestyle that may be waiting for you.

Also, if you trust them with your ideas, consider asking their thoughts on your potential business concepts. Inquire as to which ones they think have potential, which may not, and why.

But…

Choose your sources wisely.

It’s sometimes difficult to tell who is actually doing well in the health and fitness space. For example, some of the best entrepreneurs we know don’t have a big public profile. They’re in the trenches every day working on their craft and motivating their teams.

So, unless your goal is to grow a large social following, we encourage you not to use someone’s number of followers (or public visibility) as your only criteria.

Likewise, some of the people making a big show on social media, or through PR campaigns, don’t have a business that matches their public performance. So, again, make sure you know whether the person you’re turning to for business-building advice is truly believable.

If the person does have tangible success, it’s important to make sure their version of success matches yours. For instance, if you want to create success online through creating sustainable client results, don’t copy someone who’s made money selling short-term (and possibly scammy) solutions.

Step 6: Narrow down your options

After you’ve had some discussions to get a better sense of what others have done to succeed and what they think of your options, begin to narrow down your choices.

Consider which potential business options seem more reasonable, which have a higher probability of success, and which you’re most excited about.

Do one or two rise above the rest? If so, consider setting aside the rest and fleshing out those with the most potential.

Step 7: Organize your ideas into a Lean Canvas

The Lean Canvas is a one-page business-plan template that’ll help you deconstruct your idea into its key assumptions.

Unlike detailed business plans that often take weeks or months to craft (and barely get read), the Lean Canvas takes 20 minutes to create and helps paint a good picture of your business at a glance.

Click here for the Change Maker Academy Lean Canvas Template
(with step-by-step instructions)

We recommend you fill this out to the best of your ability to get a general sense of what your idea entails, what assumptions you need to test, and what steps might be required to take your idea from vision to reality.

You can think of it as a working document that you can update every month or so as you find more evidence and test your idea in the real world.

Step 8: Talk to potential customers

In order to figure out what your potential clients want, and are willing to pay for, you need to talk with them, gather insights, and craft your offering to meet those needs.

Most businesses fail because they assume they know what clients want—and spend lots of time and money building it—only to find out later that no one actually wants what they’re selling.

To better understand your potential customers’ wants and needs, we recommend learning about a research methodology called Jobs To Be Done.

Jobs To Be Done helps you assume less, ask strategic questions, and listen deeply to figure out the real reasons people buy what they do, when they do.

It also helps you map people’s decision-making timelines, like this:

And the forces that push and pull them into making decisions, like this:


Weiterlesen: https://www.precisionnutrition.com/guide-to-starting-a-health-and-fitness-business

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